Edge of the World

You may not believe it but the Edge of the World is located in North Western Tasmania near the mouth of the Arthur River.

Edge of the World Marker at Gardiner Point, Tasmania

Edge of the World Marker at Gardiner Point, Tasmania

Our initial aim was to visit the Tarkine Forest Adventure at Dismal Swamp as there is a significant forest growing in an ancient sink hole.  The site has been developed significantly and includes a 110 metre slide into the forest for the adventure minded.  When we arrived we found the place was closed and it looked unlikely to open any time soon.  Somewhat disappointed we drove on toward Arthur River and decided to check the website later for further information about the site in case we could reschedule our visit. http://www.adventureforests.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=19&Itemid=27

Green Point Beach

Green Point Beach

Following the Bass Highway from Stanley we quickly find ourselves at the village of Marrawah; we travelled a few more kilometres and arrived at Green Point a coastal beach near Ann Bay.  All the country in this region is basically good agricultural land and dairy country with the area further to the south being part of the Arthur Pieman Conservation Area and the Tarkine.

There wasn’t a lot to see at Marrawah or Green Point so we backtracked and moved on to the town of Arthur River which, not surprisingly, nestles on the banks of the Arthur River.  There are quite a few homes at Arthur River probably mainly holiday homes and a few fishermen.  Obviously some of these folks would also work for the Parks and Wildlife Service and some tourism ventures.

Arthur River Mouth

Arthur River Mouth

Driftwood Near Mouth of Arthur River

Driftwood Near Mouth of Arthur River

We travelled across the bridge over the river and headed to its mouth to the site of the Edge of the World http://www.theedgeoftheworld.com.au/ .  This site is marked by a cairn with a metal plaque attached containing the words to a verse by Brian Inder.  It is a very picturesque spot with interesting geographical formations where the action of waves and wind have sculptured unique shapes and where years of swift water flowing down the river has dumped many large logs to create piles of weathered driftwood on the banks.

Couta Rocks Place Name Sign

Couta Rocks Place Name Sign

After morning tea we headed further south to Couta Rocks which is a fairly remote location about 15 kilometres south of Arthur River.  We planned to return to Smithton via a different route and Couta Rocks was the intersection where the road turned towards Smithton.  If you want to, you can travel this route all the way to Zeehan but it would be a very dusty trip as the road is unsealed with a grey gravel surface that sticks to the car.  With the amount of stones thrown up from the back of the vehicle, even with the Rock-Tamers fitted, the potential for damage to whatever you were towing would be quite high.

Structure at Couta Rocks

Structure at Couta Rocks

Sixteen kilometres along from the turnoff at Couta Rocks, the road branches with the southern route to Zeehan and the North-Eastern track back to Smithton.  We travelled on to Roger River and thence to Edith Creek which is a small town where there is a Devondale milk factory.  In Smithton there is a Tasmanian Dairy factory and down the road at Wynyard there is a Fonterra factory – you can see that dairy is a big industry in this part of the world.

Rocky Cape Lighthouse

Rocky Cape Lighthouse

Further on from Edith Creek one can go via a number of different routes including through Irishtown (which we chose) on to Smithton where we stopped for lunch.  After lunch we did a bit more backtracking along the Bass Highway to the Rocky Cape National Park and the historic lighthouse.  Lighthouses were the order of the day and we travelled further east to the lighthouse at Table Cape.  Near this lighthouse is a tulip farm which would be spectacular when all the flowers were in bloom (not the case at present).

Table Cape Lighthouse

Table Cape Lighthouse

At a lookout near the lighthouse we encountered a family of blue wrens and were entertained by the constant movement of the females and the flitting and flying of the blue coloured male birds.

More Later!

Blue Wren at Table Cape Lookout

Blue Wren at Table Cape Lookout

This entry was posted in Travel and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s