Cockle Creek

We left the Tahune Air Walk and returned to Geeveston shortly after lunch; we turned right on the road south and travelled on through Waterloo, Surges Bay, Glendevie and Walpole to Dover then on through Strathblane to Southport http://www.farsouthtasmania.com/southport.html.

Jetty at Southport

Jetty at Southport

When we initially planned our trip we had contemplated an overnight stay at Southport but decided ultimately to leave the caravan in Hobart and travel south just in the truck.  There is not a lot to see in Southport and it seems to be a haven for fishermen with a reasonably large sheltered anchorage adjacent to the town.  The town has a history of convict settlement and was once the largest town in Tasmania before giving up this honour to Hobart.  Timber was milled in the area in the early days but is no longer a feasible industry.

View of Bay at Southport

View of Bay at Southport

Following our afternoon tea on the foreshore we moved west and south to Ida Bay.  This hamlet is the home of the Ida Bay Railway http://idabayrailway.com.au/ the southernmost railway in Australia.  The railway only runs on certain days and although it was running when we were in town we didn’t take a ride instead driving on to Catamaran and Cockle Creek.  At this point the road is gravel but in quite good condition; the obligatory corrugations exist and since there had been recent rain in the area there were quite a few potholes to contend with.

Sign Indicating Closeness to the End of the World

Sign Indicating Closeness to the End of the World

When you drive into the Cockle Creek village a sign informs you that this once thriving community now has a population of 3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cockle_Creek_%28Tasmania%29.  Cockle Creek is obviously a very popular camping and fishing spot as there are numerous camps and caravans to be seen along the road and in the adjacent beach side camping area.  The road carries on for about a kilometre south of the village to the parking area for the whale sculpture (http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/file.aspx?id=19219)(http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Whale_sculpture_Cockle_Creek.jpg)

Sign in The Parking Area for Whale Sculpture

Sign in The Parking Area for Whale Sculpture

This is a far as the road goes and you need to walk from here or travel by water.  From this point it is an easy two hour return walk to Fishers Point (http://www.farsouthtasmania.com/fisherspoint.html) or a four hour return trip to South Cape Bay http://www.parks.tas.gov.au/?base=1521  At the point of the whale sculpture parking area the road is noted on tourist brochures as the “Most Southerly Road in Australia”.  We haven’t been to the most northerly road in Australia but we have been to the most southerly.  http://www.ontheroad.com.au/old/previous/october2000/oct00cape.htm

The Whale Sculpture

The Whale Sculpture

After visiting the Whale Sculpture we headed north towards Hobart and our caravan.  We stopped along the way to purchase some lovely crisp apples from a roadside stall then in Huonville we filled the car with fuel.  Our last stop before home was at the Honey Pot on the outskirts of Huonville to buy (you guessed it) honey.  Tasmania has a great variety of honey to choose from and I am trying to sample as many varieties of creamed and candied honey as I can while in the state.

Rocks and Kelp at Whale Sculpture

Rocks and Kelp at Whale Sculpture

We arrived home in the late afternoon weary but well satisfied following a very interesting day.

More Later!

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