Yorke Peninsula

After ten days in Adelaide on Wednesday we packed up our goods and chattels and headed off through the heavy morning traffic toward Port Wakefield and the start of our trip through the Yorke Peninsula (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yorke_Peninsula).  Having travelled north-west to Port Wakefield (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Wakefield,_South_Australia) from Adelaide we reached the head of the Gulf of St Vincent (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_St_Vincent) and started the journey south along the western side of the Gulf.

Kangaroo Statue at a Roadside Stop at the beginning of the Yorke Highway

Kangaroo Statue at a Roadside Stop at the beginning of the Yorke Highway

Our Rig at the Start of the Yorke Highway

Our Rig at the Start of the Yorke Highway

We travelled past Port Clinton, Price, Tiddy Widdy Beach and Ardrossan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ardrossan,_South_Australia).  We had planned to travel south along the east side of the peninsula but just before we reached Billy Goat Flat (on the way to Port Vincent) a road sign indicated “Marion Bay” and we veered on to this road as Marion Bay (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Bay,_South_Australia) was our ultimate destination.  This road, the Yorke Highway, travelled diagonally across the peninsula to reach the west coast at Hardwicke Bay (http://www.hardwickebay.org/).

Measuring Fish at the Jetty at Marion Bay

Measuring Fish at the Jetty at Marion Bay

We followed the Yorke Highway to Minlaton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minlaton,_South_Australia) and on to Hardwicke Bay and Warooka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warooka,_South_Australia) then down to Marion Bay where we decided to stop for the night.  From Marion Bay we took a short drive to Stenhouse Bay (at the entry to Innes National Park) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stenhouse_Bay,_South_Australia) to take a look at the jetty used for the transport of gypsum from the area for many years.

Jetty at Stenhouse Bay

Jetty at Stenhouse Bay

Corny Point Lighthouse

Corny Point Lighthouse

Next we drove across the foot of the peninsula to Corny Point (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corny_Point,_South_Australia).  Once we reached Dunn Point we drove out to the Corny Point Lighthouse (http://www.southaustralia.com/info.aspx?id=9006361) which was originally built in 1882 and attended by a lighthouse keeper until being automated with an acetylene light in 1920 and converted to electricity in 1978.

Plaque on the Lighthouse at Corny Point

Plaque on the Lighthouse at Corny Point

We returned to Marion Bay and took a walk on the local jetty and had a look at the village.  A visit to the local tavern in search of fish and chips proved futile (we had to wait until after 6:00pm for food to be available) so we returned to the caravan park.

Fellow Travellers Taking a Break at Maitland

Fellow Travellers Taking a Break at Maitland

Pioneer Park at Maitland

Pioneer Park at Maitland

Thursday morning we were up early for the trip back up the Yorke Peninsula travelling on the western side of the peninsula adjacent to the Spencer Gulf.  We retraced our steps to Warooka and then to Minlaton where we stopped for fuel; then we travelled north to Maitland (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maitland,_South_Australia) and stopped at a nice little park for morning tea.  We took a walk in town and visited the local markets where we picked up some tasty homemade apricot jam.

Community Market at Maitland

Community Market at Maitland

Statue at Maitland in Honour of the Clydesdale Horse Used to Develop Properties in the Area

Statue at Maitland in Honour of the Clydesdale Horse Used to Develop Properties in the Area

Driving further north through Moonta (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moonta,_South_Australia) then on to Kadina (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kadina,_South_Australia) which seemed to be quite a substantial town, then on to Port Broughton (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Broughton,_South_Australia) and along the road towards Port Pirie.  We stopped for lunch at a lay-by off the road then headed on taking the route towards Crystal Brook (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_Brook,_South_Australia) rather than directly into Port Pirie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Pirie).  We reached the Princes Highway and found a police roadblock (we were waved through); there were lots of officers and dogs and apparently they were searching vehicles for drugs.  Later that evening we saw on the local TV news that the operation had some success with substantial quantities of drugs confiscated as a result.

The Start of the Long Jetty at Port Germein

The Start of the Long Jetty at Port Germein

The End of the Original Jetty at Port Germein

The End of the Original Jetty at Port Germein

Fishermen at Port Germein

Fishermen at Port Germein

The Old Light at Port Germein

The Old Light at Port Germein

Information Board at the Jetty at Port Germein

Information Board at the Jetty at Port Germein

We had been doing a lot of driving and not a lot of looking at various towns and decided not to stop at Port Pirie instead driving on to Port Germein (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Germein,_South_Australia) where we booked into the local caravan park for the night.  Port Germein is the home to what was once acclaimed to be the “world’s longest jetty”; it has since been shortened but is still quite long at approximately 1500 metres.  We took a walk along the jetty to stretch our legs and check what the fishermen were bagging (squid and blue swimmer crabs and as the tide came in silver whiting).

Street Art in Port Germein

Street Art in Port Germein

Plaque on Street Art in Port Germein

Plaque on Street Art in Port Germein

Sunrise at Port Germein

Sunrise at Port Germein

The Southern Flinders Ranges near Port Augusta

The Southern Flinders Ranges near Port Augusta

Next morning we drove on and as we approached the outskirts of Port Augusta (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Augusta,_South_Australia) our short tour of the Yorke Peninsula came to an end and we prepared for our similarly brief tour of the Eyre Peninsula.

More Later!

This entry was posted in Travel and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s