Hobart – our 2016 visit

From Burnie we had decided to travel to Hobart via the Highland Lakes Road (http://www.roamingdownunder.com/deloraine-drive.php) and Bothwell (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bothwell,_Tasmania) so we set off from Burnie around 9 am on Tuesday morning. The route took us along the Bass highway to Deloraine then south via the Highland Lakes Road.

Morning Tea stop at Deloraine

Morning Tea stop at Deloraine

Winding our way up along the western tiers, the road, although a good bitumen standard, twisted and turned as it rose higher and higher eventually reaching the central plateau and the first view of the Great Lake (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Lake_%28Tasmania%29).

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Rest stop driving through the Western Tiers

Rest stop driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Driving through the Western Tiers

Our first view of the Great Lake

Our first view of the Great Lake

From this point we traversed one of the three gravel sections on the road as we drove along the banks of the Great Lake. In all there are three gravel sections comprising just over 30 kilometres of gravel road which is generally in good condition and far from what one would call rough.

A view of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

Shack on the shore of the Great Lake

Shack on the shore of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

A view of the Great Lake

A gravel section of the Highland Lakes Road

A gravel section of the Highland Lakes Road

Sheep at Boundary Bay - The Great Lake

Sheep at Boundary Bay – The Great Lake

Crossing the Shannon River on the way to Bothwell

Crossing the Shannon River on the way to Bothwell

Travelling along the western shore of the Great Lake we eventually reached the township of Miena; we had passed many “shacks” along the shore of the Lake but there appeared to be no particular village until we reached Miena. South of Miena we travelled through the Steppes where we found an unusual sculpture gallery along the side of the road – we stopped to take a look and were thoroughly enthralled by the collection.

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

One of the Steppes Sculptures

Plaque detailing the history of the Steppes Sculptures

Plaque detailing the history of the Steppes Sculptures

The Steppes Sculptures

The Steppes Sculptures

From there it was a relatively short drive until we reached out destination for the day – Bothwell.

On the road to Bothwell

On the road to Bothwell

On the road to Bothwell

On the road to Bothwell

Bothwell - we have arrived

Bothwell – we have arrived

At Bothwell we called at the Castle hotel and had a huge lunch of beef schnitzel (plus chips and salad) – without a word of a lie these schnitzels overlapped the large dinner plates on which they were served.

Castle Hotel Bothwell

Castle Hotel Bothwell

After we had thoroughly stuffed ourselves with food we went to our accommodation for the evening – a renovated and internally modified historic cottage. The exterior had retained its historic appearance while fittings in the interior had been modified for the comfort of patrons. Margaret took advantage of the free guest washing machine and did some laundry and after tea we watched TV for a couple of hours before retiring for the night.

The Exterior of our cottage at Bothwell

The Exterior of our cottage at Bothwell

The Exterior of our cottage at Bothwell

The Exterior of our cottage at Bothwell

If only the Internet would work

If only the Internet would work

Modernised kitchen in our cottage at Bothwell

Modernised kitchen in our cottage at Bothwell

Whites Corner Cottages at Bothwell

Whites Corner Cottages at Bothwell

The new Post Office at Bothwell

The new Post Office at Bothwell

The Old Post Office at Bothwell

The Old Post Office at Bothwell

Bothwell Grange accommodation at Bothwell

Bothwell Grange accommodation at Bothwell

Uniting Church Bothwell

Uniting Church Bothwell

The next phase of the journey was to be to Hobart and as this was only a 60 kilometre trip we decided to deviate to Oatlands first as the town was close by.

Along the road between Bothwell and Oatlands

Along the road between Bothwell and Oatlands

Along the road between Bothwell and Oatlands

Along the road between Bothwell and Oatlands

At Oatlands we called in to see the Callington Mill which we had visited during our trip to Tasmania in 2013; this time we decided to take the Mill Tour which allows access to the interior of the mill and explains the operational aspects of the milling process.

The entrance to Callington Mill

The entrance to Callington Mill

Callington Mill - Oatlands Tasmania

Callington Mill – Oatlands Tasmania

Callington Mill - Oatlands Tasmania

Callington Mill – Oatlands Tasmania

Callington Mill - Oatlands Tasmania

Callington Mill – Oatlands Tasmania

After the tour we enjoyed complimentary scones baked with locally milled flour then drove to an adjacent lake where we completed our morning tea with Lions fruit cake and coffee.

Between Oatlands and Hobart

Between Oatlands and Hobart

Near Kempton - the festival is on February 21st

Near Kempton – the festival is on February 21st

Between Oatlands and Hobart

Between Oatlands and Hobart

Between Oatlands and Hobart

Between Oatlands and Hobart

Lifting Bridge over the Derwent River

Lifting Bridge over the Derwent River

From Oatlands we drove the relatively short distance along the midland highway to Hobart and arrived at our accommodation – The Mayfield on Cavell Motel (http://mayfaironcavell.com/) at about 12:30pm. After checking in we checked out a nearby convenience store then the local pub where we organised a light lunch.

Motel Mayfair on Cavell - in Hobart

Motel Mayfair on Cavell – in Hobart

Lovely Fuchsia at the motel where we stayed in Hobart

Lovely Fuchsia at the motel where we stayed in Hobart

In the afternoon, we decided to visit the lookout at Mt Wellington (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Wellington_%28Tasmania%29); the mountain dominates the local skyline and can often be seen with snow at its peak. The trip to the mountain winds its way over 1000 metres up from the level of the city and is a very interesting drive. Of course the views from the peak are breathtaking particularly when the weather is clear. It is a very popular tourist spot and when we arrived there were several hundred others already at the top. We took many photos and checked out all the vantage points before returning to the motel.

View of Hobart from Mt Wellington.

View of Hobart from Mt Wellington.

Tower atop Mt Wellington - visible from many parts of Hobart

Tower atop Mt Wellington – visible from many parts of Hobart

View of Hobart from Mt Wellington

View of Hobart from Mt Wellington

Tasman Bridge viewed from Mt Wellington

Tasman Bridge viewed from Mt Wellington

Hobart sea front viewed from Mt Wellington

Hobart sea front viewed from Mt Wellington

The view of Mt Wellington from beneath the Trig Station

The view of Mt Wellington from beneath the Trig Station

View platform Mt Wellington

View platform Mt Wellington

Wrest Point viewed from Mt Wellington

Wrest Point viewed from Mt Wellington

Bellerive Oval viewed from Mt Wellington

Bellerive Oval viewed from Mt Wellington

Margaret (cold) at the fireplace hut on Mt Wellington (sorry complete fire ban today)

Margaret (cold) at the fireplace hut on Mt Wellington (sorry complete fire ban today)

Thursday morning was cool but clear and we chose to visit the Royal Tasmanian Botanical Gardens (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Tasmanian_Botanical_Gardens).

Wooden sculpture of a gardener from the 1800s near the main entry at the Hobart Gardens

Wooden sculpture of a gardener from the 1800s near the main entry at the Hobart Gardens

We visited the Gardens in 2013 and were disappointed to find that parts of the gardens (notably “The Patch” from Gardening Australia) were being renovated. The renovation has now been completed (http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s4051423.htm) and the garden is in full production as the Tasmanian Community Food Garden.

The food garden is a partnership with many organisations at the Hobart Gardens

The food garden is a partnership with many organisations at the Hobart Gardens

We had a close look at this site and then explored many other parts of the gardens that we had not previously seen – it really is a great place.

Pumpkins growing well at the Community Garden at Hobart Garden

Pumpkins growing well at the Community Garden at Hobart Garden

Berries growing well at Hobart Gardens

Berries growing well at Hobart Gardens

The busy bees in a pumpkin flower at Hobart Gardens

The busy bees in a pumpkin flower at Hobart Gardens

Rhubarb growing well at Hobart Gardens

Rhubarb growing well at Hobart Gardens

Kiwi fruit on the vine at Hobart Gardens

Kiwi fruit on the vine at Hobart Gardens

A protective mother and five ducklings at Hobart Gardens

A protective mother and five ducklings at Hobart Gardens

Water Lilly at Hobart Gardens

Water Lilly at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Succulents at the Hobart Gardens

Succulents at the Hobart Gardens

Cacti at the Hobart Gardens

Cacti at the Hobart Gardens

A Lilly lagoon at the Hobart Gardens

A Lilly lagoon at the Hobart Gardens

Tree Ferns at the Hobart Gardens

Tree Ferns at the Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Entrance to the Japanese Gardens at the Hobart Gardens

Entrance to the Japanese Gardens at the Hobart Gardens

Bridge in the Japanese Garden section of the Hobart Gardens

Bridge in the Japanese Garden section of the Hobart Gardens

Water feature in the Japanese Garden at the Hobart Gardens

Water feature in the Japanese Garden at the Hobart Gardens

Fuchsia at the Hobart Gardens

Fuchsia at the Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Bat Flower at the Hobart Gardens

Bat Flower at the Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

Beautiful blooms at Hobart Gardens

After exploring the gardens for about three hours we decided to eat at the local “Succulent Restaurant”. We enjoyed a great meal then wandered through the adjoining gift shop.

The Spire atop Mt Wellington as viewed from the Hobart Gardens

The Spire atop Mt Wellington as viewed from the Hobart Gardens

View of Tasman Bridge from Hobart Gardens

View of Tasman Bridge from Hobart Gardens

150th Anniversary Arch at Hobart Gardens

150th Anniversary Arch at Hobart Gardens

Plaque explaining the Anniversary Arch

Plaque explaining the Anniversary Arch

Wooden Vessel at Hobart Gardens

Wooden Vessel at Hobart Gardens

Monument to the Blue Gum - Wooden Vessel

Monument to the Blue Gum – Wooden Vessel

As we had travelled several thousand kilometres since we left home the car was showing the effects of road grime, wet weather and dusty gravel roads so we decided to locate a car wash to at least remove the worst of the dirt.

Friday we decided to check out the city centre, so after doing some washing we walked to a nearby bus stop and caught the Metro into the heart of Hobart. We wandered through the city centre checking out shops and facilities for several hours. Had lunch at a “U Beaut” bakery café – Daci and Daci (http://www.dacianddacibakers.com.au/) where there were many luscious treats to temp us (but we resisted) then caught the bus back to the motel. Spent the rest of the afternoon – Margaret ironing and me blogging.

It would be unusual to visit Hobart on a Saturday in summer and not visit the famous Salamanca Market (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salamanca_Market); so on Saturday after breakfast we walked from the motel down the hills to the market in Salamanca Place. The market has grown from a small start in 1972 to in excess of 300 licensed stallholders in 2016. All manner of goods (and some services) are available at the market from antiques, arts and crafts, books, knitting, leather goods, plants and flowers, fruit and vegetables, toys, woodwork and a good variety of beverages and take away food.

Welcome to the market - there are stalls from here to way down there

Welcome to the market – there are stalls from here to way down there

Where shall we start at Salamanca Market

Where shall we start at Salamanca Market

Need some wooden products? at Salamanca Market

Need some wooden products? at Salamanca Market

Alcoholic tastings at Salamanca Market

Alcoholic tastings at Salamanca Market

Hungry? need an egg and bacon roll at Salamanca Market

Hungry? need an egg and bacon roll at Salamanca Market

Music to suit all tastes at Salamanca Market

Music to suit all tastes at Salamanca Market

Tee shirts galore at Salamanca Market

Tee shirts galore at Salamanca Market

Humorous posters at Salamanca Market

Humorous posters at Salamanca Market

All sorts of knick knacks at Salamanca Market

All sorts of knick knacks at Salamanca Market

Sound advice at Salamanca Market

Sound advice at Salamanca Market

There are people everywhere

People everywhere at Salamanca Market

People everywhere at Salamanca Market

People everywhere at Salamanca Market

People everywhere at Salamanca Market

People everywhere at Salamanca Market

People everywhere at Salamanca Market

and movement in the market is sometimes dictated by the masses. If one wants to look at the goods available or to buy food or whatever sometimes it requires a lot of patience (or rudeness). Many languages can be heard in the market and there are obviously tourists from all over the world visiting at any time. It was a very interesting morning at the market.

Little dogs get to ride about at Salamanca Market

Little dogs get to ride about at Salamanca Market

Berries for all tastes at Salamanca Market

Berries for all tastes at Salamanca Market

Products made from recycled rubber on sale at Salamanca Market

Products made from recycled rubber on sale at Salamanca Market

Food to suit all tastes at Salamanca Market

Food to suit all tastes at Salamanca Market

I knew I should have checked out the Cockatool at Salamanca Market

I knew I should have checked out the Cockatool at Salamanca Market

Need a taste of Single Malt at Salamanca Market

Need a taste of Single Malt at Salamanca Market

Even have your future told at Salamanca Market (could be frightening)

Even have your future told at Salamanca Market (could be frightening)

Whatever these are at Salamanca Market

Whatever these are at Salamanca Market

Bags made from rags (material) at Salamanca Market

Bags made from rags (material) at Salamanca Market

Sweets galore at Salamanca Markets

Sweets galore at Salamanca Markets

Joanna's Jams at Salamanca Market

Joanna’s Jams at Salamanca Market

Lots of bulbs at Salamanca Market

Lots of bulbs at Salamanca Market

I should have checked out the Salmon Sausages at Salamanca Market

I should have checked out the Salmon Sausages at Salamanca Market

Hats galore (and some fool taking pictures just when I'm trying on my new cap) at Salamanca Market

Hats galore (and some fool taking pictures just when I’m trying on my new cap) at Salamanca Market

Berry delights at Salamanca Market

Berry delights at Salamanca Market

Dresses galore at Salamanca Market

Dresses galore at Salamanca Market

Stuffed toys too at Salamanca Market

Stuffed toys too at Salamanca Market

Hats, hats and more hats at Salamanca Market

Hats, hats and more hats at Salamanca Market

He was already "Big and Strange" but sounded alright at Salamanca Market

He was already “Big and Strange” but sounded alright at Salamanca Market

Even a Scottish Pipe Band was playing at Salamanca Market

Even a Scottish Pipe Band was playing at Salamanca Market

We bought some cherries, plums and apples, as well as the obligatory coffee while we were at Salamanca Markets but after a couple of hours, patience with the crowds wears thin and we escaped to a shopping centre in the city where we enjoyed a pleasant lunch. After looking at a few more shops we made our way to the bus stop and caught a Metro Bus back to the motel.

On Sunday morning we will leave Hobart to commence our drive up the east coast and eventually to Launceston. Our first stop along the way will be at Port Arthur where we have accommodation booked for Sunday evening.

More later!

 

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