Launceston and the North

When we left Scamander the weather was quite bright but there was an increasing presence of smoke the further west we travelled.

A smoke haze clouded the landscapes as we drove

A smoke haze clouded the landscapes as we drove

We drove through St Helens and then west along the Tasman Highway; once we reached the turnoff to Pyengana we were travelling on previously untraveled road as we had not previously been this way.

The road up the range through the Weldborough Pass twisted and turned and was quite steep both going up and obviously coming down.

Up through Weldborough Pass on the way to Scottsdale

Up through Weldborough Pass on the way to Scottsdale

The road twists and turns

The road twists and turns

There are many tree ferns lining the road over the mountains

There are many tree ferns lining the road over the mountains

Reaching the village of Weldborough (http://www.aussietowns.com.au/town/weldborough-tas), we met a party of several motorbikes departing the Weldborough Pub and travelling west and were soon overtaken as the bikes handled the twisty road much more easily than we did.

Motorcyclists leaving the Weldborough Pub some in front of us some behind

Motorcyclists leaving the Weldborough Pub some in front of us some behind

Along the road between Weldborough and Derby

Along the road between Weldborough and Derby

The bikes are past us and quickly away

The bikes are past us and quickly away

When we reached the historic town of Derby (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derby,_Tasmania) we again encountered the bikes outside another pub.

A "fishy" rock on the side of the road above Derby

A “fishy” rock on the side of the road above Derby

The Town of Derby from above

The Town of Derby from above

Welcome to Derby

Welcome to Derby

Just after Branxholm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Branxholm,_Tasmania) we turned off the highway to take a look at Ringarooma (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringarooma), Ian McNamara of “Australia All Over” (http://www.abc.net.au/australiaallover/) fame often suggests that listeners give him a “ringarooma” so we thought we would see what the town was like.

When one leaves the highway to travel to Ringarooma, dependent upon the route one takes, the first town one encounters is a place called Legerwood and the most striking thing about this small community are the memorial carvings one encounters when one enters the town (http://www.northeasttasmania.com.au/legerwood-memorial-carvings).

We have arrived at Legerwood

We have arrived at Legerwood

The rest stop at Legerwood

The rest stop at Legerwood

Some of the carved trees at Legerwood

Some of the carved trees at Legerwood

One of the carved trees at Legerwood

One of the carved trees at Legerwood

One of the carved trees at Legerwood

One of the carved trees at Legerwood

The carved trees at Legerwood

The carved trees at Legerwood

One of the carved trees at Legerwood

One of the carved trees at Legerwood

These carvings are a memorial to World War I soldiers and are a great memorial to the fallen diggers. “The trees used in these carvings were planted in 1918 as a tribute to local soldiers lost in WWI. By 2001 the trees had become unsafe, and were to be removed completely” before members of the community stepped in and arranged the carved memorials.

The trees were planted as a memorial to WWI Diggers

The trees were planted as a memorial to WWI Diggers

After inspecting the carvings and taking time for morning tea we travelled on to Ringarooma to see what the town had to show before we turned around to head off toward on the rest of the journey.

Welcome to Ringarooma

Welcome to Ringarooma

The Ringarooma Hotel

The Ringarooma Hotel

This house at Ringarooma can be yours for around $300K

This house at Ringarooma can be yours for around $300K

Ringarooma General Store

Ringarooma General Store

Post Office Ringarooma

Post Office Ringarooma

Reaching Legerwood once again, we opted to take the most direct route back to the highway via the appropriately dubbed “Snake Track”. This road was signed as being unsuitable for caravans and the like and wisely so as it was exactly like the track of a snake over a rough, unsealed, dusty road.

Love From Tassie water bottling plant at Legerwood

Love From Tassie water bottling plant at Legerwood

The Snake track at Legerwood

The Snake track at Legerwood

The Snake track at Legerwood

The Snake track at Legerwood

Back on the highway the next major town was Scottsdale and after largely skirting the town we headed south west toward Launceston.

A few of these big fellows on the road around Scottsdale

A few of these big fellows on the road around Scottsdale

Welcome to Scottsdale

Welcome to Scottsdale

Farewell from Scottsdale - the approach from the other side welcomes travellers to the town

Farewell from Scottsdale – the approach from the other side welcomes travellers to the town

After Scottsdale the road again winds up and over another range and it was at the bottom of the range that we encountered a semi-trailer which we then followed at about 40 kilometres per hour for quite a while before we managed to get by near Nunamara.

Along the road from Scottsdale

Along the road from Scottsdale

We were stuck behind this truck for quite a while

We were stuck behind this truck for quite a while

We were stuck behind this truck for quite a while

We were stuck behind this truck for quite a while

We wanted to take a look at Evandale and Perth before we got to Launceston so we turned off the highway near St Leonards and went in what we thought was the right direction relying on our GPS to find the way.

Near the turnoff to St Leonards

Near the turnoff to St Leonards

It wasn’t long before we worked out that the Bitch in the Box (the GPS) was clueless and after a considerable excursion through a number of country lanes we eventually arrived at Evandale.

A huge crop on the hillside

A huge crop on the hillside

The road to Evandale

The road to Evandale

Here we found the Prince of Wales Hotel and had a very tasty lunch.

Prince of Wales Hotel at Evandale

Prince of Wales Hotel at Evandale

Post Office Evandale

Post Office Evandale

The "Time Traveller" statue at Evandale

The “Time Traveller” statue at Evandale

After walking around the village for a while we headed off to see what Perth had to offer.

Welcome to Perth

Welcome to Perth

Perth is a small town straddling the highway into Launceston.

An impossible stack of strawberry boxes tied precariously to the back of this utility and holding up traffic along the way

An impossible stack of strawberry boxes tied precariously to the back of this utility and holding up traffic along the way

We parked and took a short walk along the main street,

Sign on the window of a truck in Perth

Sign on the window of a truck in Perth

Devils Bakehouse in Perth

Devils Bakehouse in Perth

Post Office Perth

Post Office Perth

had a look at a couple of motor homes which were for sale at a local car yard

Is this our next Motor Home - Names right!

Is this our next Motor Home – Names right!

Someones unusual home in Perth

Someones unusual home in Perth

then got back into the car to drive to our accommodation, Tamar River Villas (http://tamarrivervillas.com/). We have a self-contained unit here and will stay until we depart for Devonport on Sunday morning.

Tamar River Villas

Tamar River Villas

Tamar River from the Motel balcony

Tamar River from the Motel balcony

Tamar River from the Villa

Tamar River from the Villa

Thursday morning, we were out of bed early and visited the guest laundry to do some washing. Washing done and hung out to dry and breakfast consumed we drove off to the Bridstowe Lavender Farm (http://bridestowelavender.com.au/pub/) for a looksee.

Its all happening at Lillydale

Its all happening at Lillydale

Welcome to Lillydale

Welcome to Lillydale

We previously visited the farm in 2013 when we toured with our caravan but the day we were at the farm it was raining, wet and miserable so we were confined to the café and shop. Today we were able to explore more thoroughly as the weather was fine and clear. We also enjoyed coffee and scones in the café and had a good look at the good in the shop. The farm was very busy with many visitors including a large tourist coach.

The Lavender Farm - acres and acres of Lavender

The Lavender Farm – acres and acres of Lavender

The Lavender Farm - acres and acres of Lavender

The Lavender Farm – acres and acres of Lavender

Returning to Launceston (some 55 kilometres), we decided to visit the Grindelwald Swiss Village at the Tamar Valley Resort (http://www.discovertasmania.com.au/attraction/tamarvalleyresortgrindelwaldattraction). Friends of ours had lived opposite the village before they moved north to Queensland and it was on their recommendation that we decided to visit. Interestingly we encountered a local resident who also knew our friends and we will give her best wishes to our friends when we return home.

Over fifties village at Grindelwald

Over fifties village at Grindelwald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Fountain at Swiss Village at Grindewald

Fountain at Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

Swiss Village at Grindewald

From Grindelwald we travelled back toward Launceston to Legana where we visited the Legana Tavern and enjoyed a sumptuous lunch. From the Tavern, we visited a local shopping centre where we were able to purchase some greengage plums (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greengage), recommended by our friends as a tasty treat; and then filled the vehicle at a very reasonable price and returned to the villa to deal with the washing.

On Friday morning we headed into Launceston to check out the city centre; we found a convenient parking spot and set out to explore. I called into a barber shop for a haircut while Margaret checked out a few of the nearby shops. Found a nice place for morning coffee and enjoyed the break. We found the Old Umbrella Shop (now run by the National Trust – https://www.nationaltrust.org.au/places/old-umbrella-shop/) and had a yarn to the volunteers manning the shop.

Pilgrim Uniting Church in Launceston

Pilgrim Uniting Church in Launceston

Presbyterian Church in Launceston

Presbyterian Church in Launceston

Pilgrim Uniting Church in Launceston

Pilgrim Uniting Church in Launceston

Parking is tight in Launceston - even have to park on shop awnings

Parking is tight in Launceston – even have to park on shop awnings

The Old Umbrella Shop

The Old Umbrella Shop

The Old Umbrella Shop

The Old Umbrella Shop

Catholic Church in Launceston

Catholic Church in Launceston

We spotted the Boags Brewery (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boag’s_Brewery) so headed off to see what was there was to see (https://www.jamesboag.com.au/). Unfortunately, we were a little late for the morning brewery tour (could have come back at 3:00pm) but decided to have a look through the museum on the upper floors. What we saw was most interesting and we watched a number of older commercials presented in a lighter vein that were quite humorous.

Boags Brewery in Launceston

Boags Brewery in Launceston

Boags (Esk) Brewery in Launceston

Boags (Esk) Brewery in Launceston

Large tank at Boags Brewery in Launceston

Large tank at Boags Brewery in Launceston

Cooperage display at Boags Brewery in Launceston

Cooperage display at Boags Brewery in Launceston

Bottle & Can display at Boags Brewery in Launceston

Bottle & Can display at Boags Brewery in Launceston

We were close to the National Automobile Museum of Tasmania (http://www.namt.com.au/) that we were interested in looking at so went back to relocate our car (as the parking permit was about to expire) to a car park close by.

National Automobile Museum in Launceston

National Automobile Museum in Launceston

The Albert Hall performing arts centre in Launceston

The Albert Hall performing arts centre in Launceston

Launceston City Council - Progress with Prudence

Launceston City Council – Progress with Prudence

Statuary outside the Linc in Launceston

Statuary outside the Linc in Launceston

The Linc at Launceston

The Linc at Launceston

The local Hogs Breath Café was also nearby in the old gas works building so we thought lunch was in order before our museum inspection.

The old gas works at Launceston now houses the Hogs Breath Cafe

The old gas works at Launceston now houses the Hogs Breath Cafe

After lunch we spent a fair time in the museum inspecting the exhibits – Peter Brock was featured in the current exhibit so we saw a number of the cars that he raced and a number that he influenced in production.

One of Peter Brock's 05 Holdens

One of Peter Brock’s 05 Holdens

One of Peter Brock's early race vehicles

One of Peter Brock’s early race vehicles

One of Peter Brock's 05 Holdens - the last one he raced

One of Peter Brock’s 05 Holdens – the last one he raced

Peter Brock photograph - life size

Peter Brock photograph – life size

An Indian Scooter based on the Italian Vespa

An Indian Scooter based on the Italian Vespa

All about the Bajaj Chetak Scooter

All about the Bajaj Chetak Scooter

A 1959 Vespa 150cc Motor Scooter

A 1959 Vespa 150cc Motor Scooter

GT HO Falcon

GT HO Falcon

National Automobile Museum of Tasmania

National Automobile Museum of Tasmania

After spending time at the museum we visited a local supermarket to pick up a few things then found a local car wash to clean a very dirty car – took the wet car back to the villas and dried it with the chamois to ensure a clean finish to the job.

Saturday saw us experiencing Festivale 2016 (http://www.festivale.com.au/) in City Park in Launceston. The website indicates Festivale, one of Tasmania’s premier summer events, is a three-day celebration, designed to showcase the very best of Tasmanian food, wine, beer, arts and entertainment. Staged in Launceston’s historic and picturesque City Park the ambiance of the outdoor event is unique.”

Festivale certainly was an enjoyable experience where one could enjoy any amount of food, wine, beer, cider, and soft drinks in addition to musical performers (including Kate Ceberano and Wendy Matthews) on two separate stages, buskers in a variety of different locations, and roving entertainment all over the park. Further there were separate workshops and activities for the children.

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Stalls at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Street performer at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Street performer at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Lovely Pom Pom Dahlia at City Park in Launceston

Lovely Pom Pom Dahlia at City Park in Launceston

Busy bees in the flowers at City Park Launceston

Busy bees in the flowers at City Park Launceston

Lovely Dahlia at City Park in Launceston

Lovely Dahlia at City Park in Launceston

Street Performers at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Street Performers at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Dancing Zebra at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Dancing Zebra at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Dancing Zebra at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Dancing Zebra at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Plenty of provision for patrons at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Plenty of provision for patrons at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Plenty of provision for patrons at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Plenty of provision for patrons at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Single serve pavlova - plenty of cream, plenty of sugar, LOTS OF CALORIES

Single serve pavlova – plenty of cream, plenty of sugar, LOTS OF CALORIES

Plenty of provision for patrons at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

Plenty of provision for patrons at Festivale 2016 in City Park Launceston

There were 91 different stalls where one could experience food, wine, spirits, beer, cider and soft drink and we sampled a few of these. There was even a stall where you could take a breathalyser test to check your blood alcohol level before departing the site. Literally, thousands of people were in the park during the five hours we were there and we probably left before the peak time of the late afternoon and evening.

Expecting parking to be at a premium we left the motel about 10:00am to arrive at a parking area adjacent to the site well in advance of the commencement time of 11:00am. After we parked the car we went for a walk along the river and through the Inveresk Precinct (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inveresk_and_York_Park_Precinct,_Launceston) past the Museum, Art Gallery and Launceston campus of the University. Aurora Stadium (http://www.aurorastadiumlaunceston.com.au/aurora/) is also located in this precinct as is the Launceston Tramways Museum (http://launcestontramwaymuseum.org.au/). It was a good and interesting way to fill in the time until the gates opened at Festivale.

Scull practice on the river

Scull practice on the river

Unique accommodation near the old gasworks

Unique accommodation near the old gasworks

A view of the city of Launceston

A view of the city of Launceston

The Launceston Tramway Museum

The Launceston Tramway Museum

The Launceston Tramway Museum

The Launceston Tramway Museum

Aurora Stadium in the Inveresk Precinct

Aurora Stadium in the Inveresk Precinct

An old engine awaiting restoration at Launceston

An old engine awaiting restoration at Launceston

A new building for the University at Launceston

A new building for the University at Launceston

The river, the old gasworks and the city

The river, the old gasworks and the city

The Old Gasworks at Launceston

The Old Gasworks at Launceston

A view of the city of Launceston

A view of the city of Launceston

Today is Valentine’s Day and romantic fool that I am, I completely forgot until my loving wife wished me a happy Valentine’s at the breakfast table. We left the Tamar River Villas around 9:00am and headed off toward Devonport where we will board the Spirit of Tasmania in the morning for the trip to Melbourne.

We had a few hours to fill in as we were unable to check in to the motel in Devonport until 2:00pm so we decided to turn off the highway and take an excursion to Westbury to see what was there.

Turn Right for Westbury

Turn Right for Westbury

Welcome to Westbury

Welcome to Westbury

A Church in Westbury - snapped from the car

A Church in Westbury – snapped from the car

We stopped briefly and considered whether or not to take a look at Pearns Steam World; after pulling up outside and taking a few photographs we decided to drive on.

Pearns Steam World in Westbury

Pearns Steam World in Westbury

Lovely old steam engine at Pearns Steam World

Lovely old steam engine at Pearns Steam World

The road we were on would take us on to Deloraine and thence to Devonport once we returned to the Highway. Passing through the rural hamlet of Exton

Welcome to Exton - but don't blink

Welcome to Exton – but don’t blink

it wasn’t long before we arrived at Deloraine and decided to pull up alongside the Meander River for morning tea; as it happened we were able to stop at the same spot as we had on our way south a couple of weeks ago.

We encountered these cyclists on the way in to Deloraine and had to follow them for a while

We encountered these cyclists on the way in to Deloraine and had to follow them for a while

At Deloraine we turned left for morning tea

At Deloraine we turned left for morning tea

The Meander River at Deloraine

The Meander River at Deloraine

After morning tea, we drove along the river then headed back to the highway passing through Elizabeth Town

Christmas Hills Raspberry Farm at Elizabeth Town

Christmas Hills Raspberry Farm at Elizabeth Town

ETC Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town

ETC Bakery Cafe at Elizabeth Town

to our next stop at the Ashgrove Cheese Factory (http://www.ashgrovecheese.com.au/).

Welcome to Ashgrove Cheese

Welcome to Ashgrove Cheese

Here we checked out the award winning cheese products on sale. After admiring the large pumpkins growing in the garden and photographing some of the many fibreglass cows on display, we purchased some cheese for Ron (later on) and drove on to Latrobe.

Huge pumpkins growing at Ashgrove Cheese

Huge pumpkins growing at Ashgrove Cheese

One of the fibreglass cows at Ashgrove Cheese

One of the fibreglass cows at Ashgrove Cheese

Several fibreglass cows at Ashgrove Cheese

Several fibreglass cows at Ashgrove Cheese

One of the fibreglass beasts at Ashgrove Cheese

One of the fibreglass beasts at Ashgrove Cheese

The Cherry Shed (http://www.thecherryshed.com.au/) is located adjacent to the Bass Highway at Latrobe and offers all sorts of cherry and berry based and related products for sale. The Shed offers an all-day menu for diners and a wide variety from its menu. When we visited the area in 2013 we patronised the shed and took home many products from the establishment.

Welcome to the Cherry Shed

Welcome to the Cherry Shed

About three kilometres further up the highway from the Cherry Shed one encounters “The House of Anvers” (http://anvers-chocolate.com.au/#intro) purveyors of fine chocolates and chocolate products. In addition, Anvers provides dining facilities and it was here we decided to stop for lunch.

Pork Belly for Lunch at Anvers

Pork Belly for Lunch at Anvers

Chicken Pasta for Lunch at Anvers

Chicken Pasta for Lunch at Anvers

After enjoying a sumptuous meal, we drove the few remaining kilometres into Devonport and found a parking spot in the main street.

Sailing ship in the harbour at Westbury

Sailing ship in the harbour at Devonport

Cargo ship in Port at Devonport

Cargo ship in Port at Devonport

We strolled through the business area looking in some of the shops that were open (there weren’t too many and these were generally the major chains). Eventually we decided it was close enough to two o’clock for us to check in to our overnight accommodation – The Argosy Motel (http://www.goodstone.com.au/the_argosy). The room is small but comfortable and quite adequate for an overnight stay at a quite reasonable rate. The motel is located only 4 minutes from the Spirit of Tasmania loading facilities.

In the morning we will board the Spirit of Tasmania to cross back to mainland Australia to commence our return journey to the Sunshine Coast.

More later!

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One Response to Launceston and the North

  1. Robyn Brown says:

    Wow, all your photos have been fabulous. I suppose you are now planning your next trip in your new “Hilton Motor Home”. Regards Rob-Roy

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